Memento Mori

Memento Mori is a Latin phrase that translates to "remember that you must die."

I first learned of this phrase from Sahil’s twitter thread (which is the inspiration for this post):

We have moments when we remember how fragile life is. But it doesn’t take long for our minds to forget this fragility as we go back to our routines…

Marcus Aurelius, the original stoic philosopher, said:

“Bring death to the front of your mind. Let your mortality serve to clarify your daily motivations. Let your mortality inspire you.”

Constantly remembering the finiteness of our lives is a tool for motivation.

Seeing weeks in years is powerful image to help visualize your entire life:

You can clearly depict where you are in your life and if you live a full life to 100 years old (god willing), how many weeks you have left.

Let this mental model inspire you to do the things you want to do, and not to wait.

Live the life you want to live. Live with enthusiasm. And always remember, time is ticking, so spend it wisely.

I will end with one of my favorite poems written by Dylan Thomas:

Do not go gentle into that good night,

Old age should burn and rave at close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,

Because their words had forked no lightning they

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright

Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,

And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight

Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,

Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Rage, rage against the dying of the light